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New Feature: Literacy Quiz Questions

2016-04-17 in Uncategorized

I have a hunch that one of my friends – no: at least one of my friends – believes that I attempt to sucker people into following my ideas. In contrast: I believe pretty much the exact opposite of that, namely that retard media are designed to profit from suckering the illiterate masses into their propaganda schemes. To put it simply and succinctly: The way I see it, illiterate people follow (or „believe in“) retard media; only literate people (who are able to grasp my ideas) are willing and able to follow (or „buy into“) natural language.

For this reason, I am starting a new feature on nooblogs.com: Literacy Quiz Questions. As for almost everything on this site, you need to be a member to use this feature (well, you can read without being a member, but in order to participate and share your questions and ideas, you do have to be a member 😉 ). Luckily, it’s free and easy to become a member! 😀

The way it works is as follows: You can write a question into the activity stream – WOOHOO! 😀 In order for this question to qualify as a literacy quiz question, you must start your post with the string „#Literacy #Quiz #Question:“ – and then follow with the question. You can also add additional information, thinking, etc. but the question should immediately follow the string.

Of course anyone can answer any question, but I will try to be very focused on (at least) providing my answer to any questions any member of this site might have. 🙂

I’ve thought up a question to use as an example (and I already know my own answer to this question 😛 ) – see:

#Literacy #Quiz #Question: What is the single most important factor in #Google’s #rank order of #links on any #search #engine #results #page (#SERP)? #SEO

(I will post my answer to this question … maybe in a week or two 😉 )

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One of the Main Reasons Why You Should Thank Matt Mullenweg (and the WordPress Community) for Efforts to Increase Online / Digital Literacy Rates Worldwide

2016-03-27 in Uncategorized

More than one in four websites on the globe runs on WordPress… — but that statistic doesn’t actually matter (I will get back to this statistical issue in a moment).

Wordpress logo

WordPress logo

99.9999% of all comments on the Internet are completely worthless. This is why Google decided to create and champion the “nofollow” tag — in order to delist all comments from Google’s index. Google perhaps made a very small mistake (in throwing out the 0.0001% baby with the bathwater)… yet ultimately that comes down to 2 issues: 1. Whether you want to have any “comments” indexed at all; 2. How much you value that very small number of comments you might actually want indexed. Google was also very clever to stick the smoking gun of delisting comments into the hands of other people — perhaps there is indeed no need to cry “don’t shoot” when you’re not holding a gun after all.

In any case, the result is: Comments are not indexed. For that matter: I can’t remember if I have ever seen a facebook.com post come up in the top 10 results on any Google search. I do recall seeing twitter.com posts every now and then, but perhaps this is down to Google still being undecided regarding whether to acquire twitter or not (everything has a price). In my humble opinion, no anonymous comment is worth even just that proverbial “penny for your thoughts” — if you are not willing to stand behind your own words, I don’t want to hear them at all. In my less humble opinion, what passes for identity verification / authentication is usually completely ridiculous. Ergo, in my estimation at least 99.9999% of all online comments — perhaps even 99.9999% of all online content in general — is completely worthless crap.

Now back to the batcave — I mean: the statistical issue I raised above. The reason why maybe it is not so important that more than one in four websites run on WordPress is that most of the many millions of websites are actually owned by very few people. I myself manage a portfolio of thousands… — you might call it an investment… sort of: being long on literacy in a for the most part presently still illiterate world… and I am personally myself active on only about several dozen — or perhaps a couple hundred(?) — of these sites (including, e.g., this one). I am sorry to admit that nooblogs has yet to really catch on, enter the wider vocabulary, join the ranks of Google, Facebook, Twitter, et. al. in the list of brand names deemed significant enough to be listed in a dictionary. (yet there is still hope 😉 )

So while anonymous commentators, facebook page creators and twitterati remain oblivious to their own disenfranchisement while they surf in the most sophisticated dreamworlds of virtual reality, the plain and dirty fact of the matter — the truth, if you will — is that if you don’t manage your own website, then you are unfortunately… pretty much… nobody.

If you want to be listed in the top 10 Google results for anything, then it might help to be Google (or Alphabet or whatever — in any case: evil 😈 ) or at the very least give Google a chance to make some money (by putting Google ads on your site — i.e., helping Google to earn tons of money while you can be very proud to be listed in Google at all — at least for something).

For that tiny fraction of one percent of people who are literate enough to publish something that enables the somewhat larger population of somewhat literate users of the web to be able to read what the more literate have written, WordPress has been a Godsend. Matt often speaks about the democratization of publishing — and I feel he is right to do so… yet the vast, vast,… overwhelingly vast majority have still not attained a level of literacy sufficient to publish anything of significance on the web. The success of facebook.com is a glaring document of how widespread illiteracy still is.

Matt and other creators and contributors to WordPress have done a lot to help. You should be thankful. More than that, if you are a little bit educated, you should already be running WordPress. If not, you should presently be installing it now. Otherwise, there is a high chance that you probably paid too much for your education.

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Why Literacy Rates Still Remain So Low

2016-02-09 in Uncategorized

I often lament that the vast majority of people who are active online are still by and large illiterate. I may be right, I may be wrong, I may be somewhere in between – but why does it matter?

Perhaps it matters for many reasons, but my primary concern is that I feel personal whim – whether my own personal whim or someone else’s – should not be the judge of what is good or bad.

If more people were more literate, then the web would be more of a self-organizing system. People who write about advertising in sports might publish their ideas @ sports.com … people who share their ideas about the influence of money in politics might post these to a site like influence-of-money-in-politics.org … and so on. This already happens to a limited extent – let me describe it thusly: Over the past recent decades, the WWW-population has transitioned from being about 0.01% literate to maybe being somewhere around 0.1% literate… – and let me point out that some might rejoice at the exponential growth!

Why don’t I also rejoice?

Because there are a large number of quite influential agents who seem to be opposed to any increase in the level of literacy. Indeed, there is every reason to believe that a large portion of the literate population are indeed such influencers who seek to diminish the voice of the vast majority by
keeping them misinformed, uneducated, … basically: illiterate.

These influencers are strongly represented not only among the literate minority, but also among the world’s leading brand names … and are household brands with stronger stangleholds on the vast majority of masses living in quiet desparation than gigantic armies of grade school English teachers could ever muster. Did you mean you didn’t know that already?

Why am I not surprized?

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I neither Like nor Want to Talk About Me

2016-01-30 in Uncategorized

Over the past couple days, I have been reading more or less random blog posts… — I will get to why in a moment, but I first want to remark and point out very pointedly that I really don’t like talking about me, myself, my personal feelings, etc. I don’t consider myself to be very important in the “greater scheme” of things. I find it awkward and even a little painful to watch people write, behave, act or whatever like they are the center of the world … like everyone is just waiting to find out how they feel about something. I find that sort of information boring and disingenuous (I think that’s the word I want, but I’m really not sure).

OK, so why am I writing this here and now? Thanks for asking!! 😀

Try This at HomeImitate a spiritual master [05:30-13:30]. My spiritual master is St. Therese of Lisieux, and her spiritual memoir (if you’re curious) is Story of a Soul. I was surprised to hear the person that Elizabeth picked as her spiritual master! Hint: that person’s autobiography is called Audition. (Sorry, I promised to post a photo of my shrine to St. Therese, but I’m in Australia now, and I forgot to take the picture before I left town.)

The quote above is from a podacst hosted by Gretchen Rubin together with her sister Elizabeth Craft, which I have recently discovered and enjoy very much (even though it is supported by advertising 😉 ). I enjoyed the idea which they suggest to “try this at home” in this episode (#16), and so I want to share my ideas about this here. I will call my spiritual Master X, because I don’t want to divulge their identity here without their consent. I want to share my own ideas, but I don’t want to put this person in an “awkward” position.

The way I want to imitate their behavior is that I want to try to enjoy other people for how they are different than I am.

X is also a very special person for being humble — particularly in not claiming to be right. The humility of not being right is also something I aspire to — but it is also something I feel I am very far away from (I admire it more than I practise it — I am more prone to behaving like a “know-it-all”, an issue also discussed in Episode 20 of Gretchen + Elizabeth’s podcast [12:15-14:30]).

Here are some notes I’ve jotted down about my aspirations and shortcomings to be more humble and to cherish the way other people are different:

  • From early youth, I have been very fascinated with science, mathematical proofs, logic, etc.
  • Later, I also became fascinated with subjectivity, perspective, relativity, etc.
  • This is perhaps most apparent in my admiration of Ludwig Wittgensteins’s work — but Wittgenstein is *anything but* my spiritual master, because he seemed to be so fixated on his own beliefs, absolute truth, etc.
  • My spiritual master, instead, revels in wonder and amazement at how other people behave, think, live, etc. (i.e., differently)
  • In contrast, I am often frustrated when people seem illiterate, do not understand how science works, etc.

Well, so this is why I have been trying to read what other people write … in a sort of “maybe I should just pretend like other people are indeed literate” manner … and I have become increasingly disgusted with the way people seem to be focused on themselves. 😐

I don’t want to end on such a sour note. So I will now link to a little story about some other people who also inspire me — please go ahead and check out: “Opportunity makers with + for others — doing something smarter together for the greater good“. 🙂

 

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There’s No Place Like Homepage

2016-01-26 in Uncategorized

Having recently significantly reduced my engagment on Facebook (much like I did several years ago on Twitter), I’ve been asking myself: “Where can I go?”

Nowhere, man! It really makes it! 😀

One of the first things printed after the invention of the printing press was the Bible. Perhaps an entire century passed before much of anything besides the same old, same old religious texts and tomes went to press. Perhaps another century passed before anything other than religion was not deemed sacrilegious, something to be immediately outlawed and banned from the so-called civilized world. More centuries passed, and today most libraries are filled with large numbers of texts which are not simply copies of one and the same Bible.

Today, you can find almost anything your heart desires in almost any library.

It is fascinating to see this same theme play out again on the web — with what used to take centuries (and also cost innumerable lives) now playing out over decades.

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Web Anxiety

2015-04-27 in Uncategorized

I think many people fear the World-Wide Web. My hunch is mainly based on the way people behave on websites like facebook.com: they may “like” if you add a comment, but if you write up an idea somewhere other than facebook and then post a link to what you wrote, they tend to be much less appreciative and/or supportive. I wonder why this is.

One explanation is: When someone writes a comment on someone else’s post, the person who started the post feels that they are being paid attention to (regardless of which website they post on — their own or someone else’s). Likewise: a link “away” from the post is interpreted as detracting from that post (and the post’s initiator may feel this detraction is taking attention away from them personally).

Of course: People could engage at many different locations, but there is an uncertainty involved in switching from one location to another. Whether rational or irrational, people appear to have trust in some locations more than in other locations (cf. Subjectivity + Rationality). In general, people seem to have little trust in locations they are not familiar with — and a generalized kind of web anxiety is a sign of a relatively low level of literacy (or “online literacy”) with respect to navigating the web.

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